January 11, 2017 by mike@wyep.org

 

"They reach into your room," Elton said, "Just feel their gentle touch." Every now and again, we all have to wallow in our misery. And we all know that "when all hope is gone, sad songs say so much." For a really good, nice wallow, the garden variety song with a tinge of depression just won't do. Overblown woe with a theatrical grandiosity is the ticket for today's on-the-go Sad Sack. We've collected a number of sad songs below and rated them from one to four boxes of tissues you'll need to soak up those tears from a trickle to a river.

And be sure to catch some of these, plus more music for Sad Sacks throughout the day, from 6 AM to 6 PM Friday January 13th on WYEP.

 

  • The Cure, "Boys Don't Cry"

Robert Smith and company have provided their share of good tear-jerkers over the years. In fact, when "Friday I'm in Love" was released in 1992, some fans wondered if Smith had been kidnapped and replaced by a bizarre double-agent from Happyland. "Boys Don't Cry" is one of the standard bearers for the goth-rock mainstays. (Even dubbing the band "goth" makes Smith sad.)

sample lyric: "I try and laugh about it, hiding the tears in my eyes/Because boys don't cry"

weepiness rating: 2 boxes of tissues

 

  • Marvin Gaye, "I Heard It Through The Grapevine"

No one wants to be the last one to know any important info, let alone the tragic detail that your significant other is now another's other. That's rough. Gladys Knight recorded this song first, but while her version is soulful with some powerful singing, Marvin really makes you feel it. That slight raspiness in his voice comes across as a catch in the throat, kicking up the song into an extra tissue zone.

sample lyric: "Losing you would end my life you see 'cause you mean that much to me/You could have told me yourself that you loved someone else/Instead I heard it through the grapevine"

weepiness rating: 3 boxes of tissues

 

  • Prince, "When Doves Cry"

On paper, it's got all the theatrical sadness one would need, but how can you be very sad when you're listening to such a joyful arrangement?

sample lyric: "How can you just leave me standing, alone in a world that's so cold?"

weepiness rating: 1 boxes of tissues

 

  • The Replacements, "Unsatisfied"

One can think of this song as the flipside to John Lennon's "I Want You (She's So Heavy)" with The Beatles. Lennon told Rolling Stone magazine in 1970, "When you're drowning, you don't say, 'I would be incredibly pleased if someone would have the foresight to notice me drowning and come and help me.' You just SCREAM." With this Replacements classic, Paul Westerberg repeatedly rages against the lie that his life appears to be and cries for the satisfaction that never comes, and he imbues his vocals with every ounce of those emotions. But we'll still deduct one tissue box for being more angst-y than weepy.

sample lyric: "I'm so, I'm so unsatisfied/I'm so dissatisfied/I'm so, I'm so unsatisfied/I'm so unsatisfied"

weepiness rating: 2 boxes of tissues

 

  • Roy Orbison, "Only the Lonely"

Let's face it. Roy Orbison is one of the music world's Godfather of Sad Sacks. His most successful period of hit singles in 1960-'61 is littered with song titles like "Only the Lonely (Know the Way I Feel)," "Today's Teardrops," "Running Scared," "Love Hurts," and the majestic "Crying." Even his perhaps best-known song, the relatively straightforward "Oh, Pretty Woman" from 1964, backs up the line, "I couldn't help but see, pretty woman, that you look lovely as can be" with the Sad Sack follow-up, "Are you lonely just like me?"

sample lyric: "There goes my baby, there goes my heart/They're gone forever, so far apart"

weepiness rating: 3 boxes of tissues

 

  • Chris Isaak, "Somebody's Crying"

Isaak has never shied away from dipping his music in the same Well of Tears as Roy Orbison, and this song is a prime example. He even uses a propulsive drumbeat on the chorus reminiscent of "Oh, Pretty Woman." And while he doesn't have the stunning vocal range of Orbison to kick the song into drama overdrive, Isaak is a master of singing with doleful vulnerability. This song is a Hallmark Movie of the Week in waiting.

sample lyric: "I know somebody and they called your name a million times, and still you never came"

weepiness rating: 3 boxes of tissues

 

  • The Smiths, "How Soon Is Now?"

Morrissey is quite simply a towering figure in the annals of Sad Sack music. He's like a Sylvia Plath poem sprung to fretful life, spewing out woe-is-me tearjerkers like he's being paid under the table by Kleenex. He's churned out songs like "What Difference Does It Make?," "Heaven Knows I'm Miserable Now," "I Want the One I Can't Have," "Last Night I Dreamt That Somebody Loved Me," "Never Had No One Ever," and "Please, Please, Please, Let Me Get What I Want" like a one-man Brill Building of self-pity (and that's not even getting to his solo songs). This song is perhaps his "Stairway to Heaven" of misery, an epic and surprisingly radio-friendly anthem to ill-at-ease Sad Sacks everywhere.

sample lyric: "You go and you stand on your own and you leave on your own and you go home and you cry and you want to die"

weepiness rating: 4 boxes of tissues

 

  • Adele, "Someone Like You"

It's like the 2011 Saturday Night Live sketch when everyone couldn't help but bust out crying listening to this song. Basically nailed it. "You both needed a good cry so you were listening to Adele's 'Someone Like You.' "  "Do you do it too?" "Everyone with a heart and an iTunes account does."

sample lyric: "I heard that you're settled down, that you found a girl and you're married now/I heard that your dreams came true, guess she gave you things I didn't give to you"

weepiness rating: 3 boxes of tissues

 

  • Merle Haggard, "Misery & Gin"

About 40% of all country songs could have been included on this list, so consider this entry as also representing all the cry-in-your-beer country weepers that are not from the boot-scootin' and bro-country end of the Grand Ole Opry spectrum. Merle was certainly no stranger to tearful tunes, from his very first single "Sing a Sad Song" to his 47th and final album in 2011 which included three songs with "blues" in their titles.

sample lyric: "Looking at the world through the bottom of a glass/All I see is a man who's fading fast"

weepiness rating: 2 boxes of tissues

 

  • The Beatles, "Eleanor Rigby"

While most of your typical Sad Sack tracks are about affairs of the heart, Paul McCartney wrote this pocket melodrama about the futility of life itself--making the Orbisons and Morrisseys of the Sad Sack world come off as Up With People by comparison.

sample lyric: "Eleanor Rigby died in the church and was buried along with her name/Nobody came"

weepiness rating: 4 boxes of tissues

 

  • Best Coast, "Why I Cry"

It's a two-minute blast of upbeat music, but the lyrics paint a vignette of alienation and self-pity in which life is a Sisyphean "never-ending hill."

sample lyric: "Look to the future, nothing's there/Don't know why I even care"

weepiness rating: 2 boxes of tissues

 

  • Eric Carmen, "All By Myself"

Even before the lyrics begin, the piano intro itself screams "here come the waterworks!" The verses are fairly compact but are packed with gorgeous touchstones of Sad Sackery: pining over lost youth, loneliness, insecurity. The choruses enter the scene like soaring eagles of melodrama, flying over awe-inspiring vistas of tear-drenched strings and ominous drum fills. And don't get me started with that Hugh McCracken guitar solo popping by like a comforting, shoulder-patting friend.

sample lyric: "Living alone, I think of all the friends I've known/But when I dial the telephone, nobody's home"

weepiness rating: 4 boxes of tissues

 

What are your favorite Sad Sack songs? Tweet us @WYEP and let us know, or post on our Facebook wall!

Listen for more sad songs on WYEP's Sad Sack Music Day on Friday January 13th, throughout the day from 6 AM to 6 PM.

Tags:
Posted in
January 11, 2017 by cindy@wyep.org

1buzz_web 
Every Wednesday at 9:13 am, one of our most trusted music aficionados joins me (Cindy Howes) on the Morning Mix to play a couple favorite new songs and share some insight. Today we welcome Justin Jacobs

In case you missed it, here's what Justin played (commentary by JJ):

Khalid, "Location" - This track came out back in spring of 2016, but it never became the big hit it should've. Though he's not even 20, Texas singer Khalid has the kind of voice that sounds wise and experienced. On this track, he's mixing neo-soul vocals with an echoing, outer space beat. It's the sound of the past and future fused into something that is very much now. 

Whitney, "No Woman" - Whitney was formed from the ashes of lo-fi rockers The Smith Westerns—the new sound is mellower, but even more likeable. The band's first album came out in mid-2016. "No Woman" is the perfect intro to Whitney, with it's eminently hummable melody that oozes the sort of hazy, confused, "Is this my life?" sentiment. Call it an anthem for not-yet-adults. 

Posted in
January 6, 2017 by cindy@wyep.org

Friday mornings on WYEP, Chef Bill Fuller (Corporate Chef for big Burrito) joins Cindy Howes at 7:30am for Pairings! Bill & Cindy challenge each other to pair up your favorite music with matching menus. Let’s see what they came up with this week. Listen to the audio: 

Posted in
January 4, 2017 by cindy@wyep.org

Every Wednesday at 9:13 am, one of WYEP’s trusted music experts joins me (Cindy Howes) on The Morning Mix to play a couple favorite new songs and share some insight. Today we welcome Sarah Wardrop from WFUV in New York!

In case you missed, it here’s what she played:

Hurray for The Riff Raff, "Rican Beach" - Alynda Lee Segarra is an artist that understands the power of music, storytelling and speaking out, and she puts that combination into action with her band Hurray for the Riff Raff. "I'll keep fighting 'til the end" is the repeated lyric that ends this song, and it's an empowering, intriguing and percussive taste of what's to come on the new album, The Navigator, which is out March 10. 

Rose Cousins, "Chosen" - Rose's voice and songwriting chops can stand on their own, but she's a constant collaborator with an incredible ability – in and out of music – to bring people together. You can hear it in the harmonies of this song, which opens her new album Natural Conclusion (out February 3) and also features the production work of Joe Henry.

Posted in
December 30, 2016 by cindy@wyep.org

Friday mornings on WYEP, Chef Bill Fuller (Corporate Chef for big Burrito) joins Cindy Howes at 7:30am for Pairings! Bill & Cindy challenge each other to pair up your favorite music with matching menus. Let’s see what they came up with this week. Listen to the audio: 

Posted in
December 28, 2016 by cindy@wyep.org

Every Wednesday at 9:13 am, one of Pittsburgh’s finest music writers joins me (Cindy Howes) on the Morning Mix to play a couple favorite new songs and share some insight. Today we welcome Scott Tady!

We asked Scott to bring in some of his top picks for 2016. In case you missed it here’s what he played with commentary by Scott:

Tady's #2 album for 2016 is Leonard Cohen from the album You Want it Darker

Music's poet laureate suspected his days were numbered as he sat down to write a swan song masterpiece. The lyrics are startling, urgent, uncompromising, confessional and packed with 82 years of wisdom, set to sparse arrangements offering both beauty and eeriness as on the title track, a dark rumination on the religious mind, blessed by the vocal harmonies of a Montreal synagogue choir. So many quotable lyrics ready to be recited and applied to our own lives as in "I was fighting with temptation, but I didn’t want to win" from this lovely track, "On The Level".

Tady's #1 of 2016 is Beach Slang, from A Loud Bash of Teenage Feelings

Punk-rock urgency but still melodic -- in a Replacements-meets-Gaslight Anthem way -- with gravelly vocals that impart heart-on-the-sleeve grace and the wisdom of being an outsider or someone pondering life's big questions. Frontman James Alex wrote most of the songs after talking with the kids who bought the band's first album and came out to see the Philly band's correlating tour.  Though the feelings here span generation gaps, catering to those who simply yearn for hard, fast and purposeful punk and alt-rock that provides an adrenaline rush as on this selected tune, "Spin the Dial". Wouldn't be a bad thing if Beach Slang spawns a bunch of copy cat bands.

Posted in
December 23, 2016 by cindy@wyep.org

Friday mornings on WYEP, Chef Bill Fuller (Corporate Chef for big Burrito) joins Cindy Howes at 7:30am for Pairings! Bill & Cindy challenge each other to pair up your favorite music with matching menus. Let’s see what they came up with this week. Listen to the audio: 

Posted in
December 21, 2016 by cindy@wyep.org

Every Wednesday at 9:13 am, one of our most trusted music aficionados joins me (Cindy Howes) on the Morning Mix to play a couple favorite new songs and share some insight. Today we welcome Patrick Bowman!

We asked Patrick to bring in his favorites of 2016. In case you missed, it here's what Patrick played: 

 
The Avalanches, "Because I'm Me" -
The Austrailian DJ collective/electronic music group dropped their sophomore album Wildflower earlier this year, off which I shared the vibe out "Colours," in an earlier buzz session, after a 16 year wait from when their groundbreaking debut Since I Left You came out in 2000.. 

"Because I'm Me" is the album's defacto opening track, and it's almost entirely focused around one amazing calssic 70s soul sample, the track "Want Ads" by the Honey Cones, a record that has been the secret weapon of DJs for years, and while I thought it had been used more often, "Because I'm Me" is actually the biggest song it's ever been featured on. The way the Avalanches use it is just really impressive, and then they stack the deck by featuring canonical Bronx hip-hop duo Camp Lo who have made a career of sounding cool as heck over 70s soul beats...they just slide on to the track and spit gorgeous verses completly locked in with the beat...it's a thing to behold.

 

Joey Purp, Cornerstore - The centerpiece from Joey Purp's insanely impressive iidrops mixtape he dropped this summer--arugably my favorite hip-hop release of the year--which is just this almost novel, headspinning, nostalgiac, tragic, and relevant, about a life living in the west side of Chicago, one of the most violent, impoverished inner city areas in the country. Joey's verse is almost stream of consciousness and gets more and more desperate and strained as the verse goes on, almost losing his breath, his compatriot Saba, another chicago native, also mirrors Joey's verse spitting off fragmented memories of living in an area where gun violence is an every day obstacle, drug dealing/gang membership is the major means of employment, and you gotta do what you gotta do to get off the block.

Posted in
December 16, 2016 by cindy@wyep.org

Friday mornings on WYEP, Chef Bill Fuller (Corporate Chef for big Burrito) joins Cindy Howes at 7:30am for Pairings! Bill & Cindy challenge each other to pair up your favorite music with matching menus. Let’s see what they came up with this week. Listen to the audio: 

Posted in
December 14, 2016 by cindy@wyep.org

1buzz_web 
Every Wednesday at 9:13 am, one of our most trusted music aficionados joins me (Cindy Howes) on the Morning Mix to play a couple favorite new songs and share some insight. Today we welcome Justin Jacobs

We asked Justin to bring in his favorites from 2016. In case you missed it, here's what Justin played (commentary by JJ):

Mitski, "Your Best American Girl" - I wasn't thrilled with the state of indie rock this year — but there were certainly some great highlights (yeah, I see you Car Seat Headrest). That said, Mitski's album Puberty 2 gave me pause, and reinstated my faith in the power of a big, blowout chorus. Her track "Your Best American Girl" is a great track to blast from car speakers on after a long day: giant, crunchy guitars, frustrated lyrics, and a sing-along melody. Want to feel your heart ripped out of your chest? Watch the video. As Courtney Barnett is an Aussie, Mitski may just be our best American girl (of indie rock).

 

 Frank Ocean, "Ivy" - Frank mastered the hype machine of modern pop music with a 'Will he or won't he" release of his epic album Blonde. After a few false starts, he did, and it was every bit as aching and beautiful as we might have hoped. Along with Chance the Rapper, Beyonce, Anderson .Paak, and Kanye West, Frank proved that hip-hop and R&B were the most dominating and innovative genres of 2016, and made me super excited to see what rolls out next year. 

Posted in
December 13, 2016 by mike@wyep.org

 

We have a lot of special programming for the upcoming holiday weekend. Below is a list of what will be different and what will be the same on our programming schedule.

 

Friday, December 23rd

  • 9AM-1PM: Kevin Gavin All-Request Holiday Music Special - For the 40th year, Kevin Gavin from our sister station WESA is hosting an all-request holiday music program, and it will once again be simulcast on both WYEP and WESA. We also invite you to visit the Community Broadcast Center during the broadcast for an open house including tours, holiday treats, and a visit from Santa. Kidsburgh will be here with some children-friendly activities. Click for more information.

(Grand Groove Radio & The Block Party will be preempted for a special music mix of some of the great musicians we lost in 2016.)

Saturday, December 24th

  • 2-5PM: The Soul Show Holiday Special - Host Mike Canton will bring you everything from James Brown to Jimi Hendrix to Caribbean steel pan. In addition, Mike will review The Soul Show's Top 10 albums of 2016.

 

  • 5PM-midnight: WYEP Holiday Mix - A continuous mix of holiday songs, traditional and new. Listen for a uniquely WYEP approach to the holidays featuring music both obvious and obscure.

(Big Town Blues & Rollin' & Tumblin' will be preempted for the WYEP Holiday Mix.)

 

Sunday, December 25th

  • midnight-11AM: WYEP Holiday Mix - A continuous mix of holiday songs, traditional and new. Listen for a uniquely WYEP approach to the holidays featuring music both obvious and obscure.

 

  • 11AM-2PM: The Roots & Rhythm Holiday Special - Holiday music with a rootsy flavor, handpicked by host Jesse Novak.

 

  • 2-5PM: WYEP Holiday Mix - A continuous mix of holiday songs, traditional and new. Listen for a uniquely WYEP approach to the holidays featuring music both obvious and obscure.

 

  • 5-8PM: An American Sampler Holiday Special - Folk and acoustic music with a holiday spin, brought to you by host Ken Batista.

 

  • 8-11PM: Bluegrass Jam Session (...with a touch of the holidays) - Host Bruce Mountjoy winds down the day with an edition of Bluegrass Jam Session that's almost back to normal but with just a slight holiday flair. Bruce will also showcase some of the best bluegrass from 2016.

(Beale Street Caravan, Dubmission, Keller's Cellar, Folk Alley, WYEP Coffeehouse, and the Sunday Mix will be preempted for the WYEP Holiday Mix.)

 

 

Tags:
Posted in
December 5, 2016 by cindy@wyep.org

Over the past year, WYEP has been proud to showcase a diverse array of Pittsburgh musicians on-air through our weekly local music spotlight, The Local 913. Each week, we were able to introduce our listeners to so many talented musicians in the area. We are able to present one of our favorite local bands live every month at The Local 913 Live, our monthly local music happy hour. At the end of the year, it's always difficult to select only 5 albums to highlight as our city's best, but here is our attempt! Please support all these hometown musicians through purchasing their music or attending one of their local concerts. 

*** WYEP’s Top 5 Local Acts for 2016 ***

1. Meeting of Important People Troika (Meeting of Important People)
MOIP Troika
Meeting of Important People's third album is another terrific collection of ear-grabbing rock tunes, but this time displaying a wider range of influences. Perhaps coincidentally (or not), songwriting this time was more of a group process among all three band mates—a key reason for the album title. Inventively co-produced by Donora's Jake Hanner and MOIP's Josh Verbanets, the album encompasses elements of country-folk, '90s alternative, Kinks-esque rock and a touch of baroque psychedelia. It also includes the fine 2015 single, "All Rode Off Together," a virtual summit meeting of guest artists from the Pittsburgh local music scene. But when all's said and done, the common denominator here is simply good, quality song craft. (MS)

2. Morgan Erina Lady (Morgan Erina)
Morgan Erin Lady
Morgan Erina’s first solo release since the dissolution of her duo, Broken Fences, showcases her beautiful, ethereal voice, songwriting, and versatility. Although it’s easy to label Erina’s music as moody and sad, Lady stirs emotions and proves enthralling from start to finish. Her voice is gripping and quietly intense, and leaves you practically begging for her next line. Treelady Studios’ Dave Hidek has added superb production touches, layers and dynamics that clearly challenged Erina’s boundaries and inspired her to push further. (CH)  

3. Pet Clinic No Face (Pet Clinic)
Pet CLinic
No Face is a tour-de-force of dark, crunchy riff rock. Rather than working in a commercial studio, the band recorded their full-length debut in their Troy Hill home. The decision allowed the band to take their time and focus on every possible detail in the recording process, including building a few pieces of their recording arsenal from scratch. David Bubenheim’s voice ranges from a quiet whisper to a blood-curdling howl over swirling guitars, atmospheric keyboards and a hard-driving rhythm section. (JS)



4. The Red Western Arrows/Sirens (The Red Western)
ArrowsSirens

The Red Western has evolved since 2007 inception, as evidenced by the sounds streaming through their simultaneously released EPs. The twin EP releases signified the band’s continued journey from alt-country to indie pop and rock sound, along with a shift from a quintet to a quartet.  Arrows is the release that continues the country leanings, while Sirens cements the band’s transition to a more guitar-forward, jangly pop sound. Lauren Delorenze's vocals highlight the varied sounds on the EPs and fit the assorted arrangements especially well. (KS)


5.
 Emerson Jay Louie (Emerson Jay)

Louie
Emerson Jay, project of producer Jared Gulden, is a breath of fresh air to the electronic scene in Pittsburgh. After attending audio engineering school in Chicago, Gulden returned home with a SoundCloud full of songs. Gulden produced tracks by replicating what his live band (Brendan Bates, Dan Evans and Pat Donovan) had worked out in concerts. Louie is colorfully sunny and cool in a way that is not overly digital. It’s truly fresh, electronic music with a soul. (CH) 

Tags:
Posted in
December 2, 2016 by mike@wyep.org

 

Last year, we had so much fun with it that we knew we'd have to do another one in 2016. So here we go again, from "ABC" by the Jackson 5 -- the first song on the list -- all the way to Red Hot Chili Peppers' "The Zephyr Song," our last track. (Should I have given a spoiler alert first? Nah, it's not the destination, it's the journey!)

I guess I should go over the parameters of the week, just so you know what to expect. All week, from December 5th through the 9th between 6 AM and 6 PM, the songs we play will be presented in alphabetical order by song title.

We're not playing our entire library alphabetically, though. We have around 20,000 albums in our library, so a quick back-of-the-envelope math suggests that it would take almost two straight years of continuous 24/7 airplay to plow through our entire library alphabetically!

Here are a couple of answers to questions we've heard from listeners about our A to Z Week:

Q: Do you allow cover songs during the A to Z Week?

Yes! However, only one version of any one song. So while we might play, say, Jimi Hendrix's cover of "All Along the Watchtower," we wouldn't also play Bob Dylan's original version. Otherwise, they would alphabetically come right next to each other and we don't want to play the same song twice in a row (great as they both are).

Q: Hey, I just heard a song with a title that begins with "The" in a different part of the alphabet! What gives?

We're using traditional alphabetization rules. (The way books are filed in your local library.) All song titles beginning with the words "A," "An," and "The" get those words dropped from the title. Numbers are sorted as if they are words. Titles that begin with non-alphanumeric characters (like a parenthesis or an apostrophe) are sorted as though that character was not there.

Q: Is there any date/year range or cut-off for songs included?

Nope. The songs we're playing this year during A to Z Week span from 1955 through to this year. Also, they're not limited by style (there will be rock, folk, soul, blues, reggae, and more) or geography (we'll have songs by local artists all the way to performers from Somalia, London, Jamaica, and Sweden).

Q: Why are you only doing this from 6 AM to 6 PM?

Well, we have a lot of great shows during the week (like the World Cafe, Grand Groove Radio, the Block Party, and WYEP Afterhours) that we don't want to mess with. We wouldn't incorporate their music into the A to Z mix because then it wouldn't show up during the show time. And we can't really do a separate A to Z during these other shows -- that would just be confusing. So each day, we'll pause the A to Z progression at 6 PM and then pick it up again at 6 AM.

If you have any other questions, feel free to send 'em my way at mike@wyep.org. And enjoy A to Z Week!

 

Mike Sauter

WYEP Director of Content and Programming

Tags:
Posted in
December 2, 2016 by cindy@wyep.org

Friday mornings on WYEP, Chef Bill Fuller (Corporate Chef for big Burrito) joins Cindy Howes at 7:30am for Pairings! Bill & Cindy challenge each other to pair up your favorite music with matching menus. Let’s see what they came up with this week. Listen to the audio: 

Posted in
November 30, 2016 by cindy@wyep.org

 
Every Wednesday at 9:13 am, one of WYEP’s trusted music experts joins me (Cindy Howes) on The Morning Mix to play a couple favorite new songs and share some insight. Today we welcome Jess Phaneuf from WUMB in Boston!

We asked Jess to bring in her favorites from 2016. In case you missed it, here's what Jess played:

2016 was a year FULL of amazing music but some releases really rose to the top for me. Ages and Ages from Portland, Oregon take my top spot for favorite album of the year with Something To Ruin...11 tracks which move through life's ups and downs with lyrics that cut to the core, sung in catchy harmonies and with an adventurous musical spirit, complete with plenty of tambourine. Yup, tambourine.

Esme Patterson really nailed it with her song "No River", which I will always hold onto as a mantra for myself. "I can't keep running, I'm no river...I know that I'm alive today, but I'm human, I'm human". 

Posted in

Pages

Twitter icon
Facebook icon
Google+ icon
Instagram icon
RSS icon
Vimeo icon